Magnetic Perturbations

Explore the interactions of magnetic fields as a swinging magnet weaves an intricate path influenced by the variable placement of other magnets on a coordinate grid.

Grades covered: 3 through 12
Curriculum Topics: Magnetism, Potential and Kinetic Energy Conversions, Coordinate pairs

Standards

Idea Sheets are cross-referenced to subjects listed in the Common Core, Next Generation Science Standards, and California Content Standards.

Common Standards Click to View

Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object. ||Next Generation Science Standards||Grade 3||Physical Science||Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions |||Make observations and/or measurements of an object’s motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion. [Examples: a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, and two children on a see-saw.] “||Next Generation Science Standards||Grade 3||Physical Science||Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions |||Ask questions to determine cause and effect relationships of electric or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with each other. [Examples: the electrical forces between a charged rod and pieces of paper; the force between 2 permanent magnets, the force between an electromagnet & steel paperclips, Focus on forces produced by objects that can be manipulated by students, & electrical interactions – limited to static.] “||Next Generation Science Standards||Grade 3||Physical Science||Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions |||Define a simple design problem that can be solved by applying scientific ideas about magnets. [ Examples: make a door latch; creating a device to keep two moving objects from touching each other.] ||Next Generation Science Standards||Grade 3||Physical Science||Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions |||Science and Engineering Practices: 1. Asking Questions and Defining Problems 2. Developing and Using Models 3. Planning and Carrying Out Investigations 4. Analyzing and Interpreting Data 5. Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking 6. Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions 7. Engaging in Argument from Evidence 8. Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information ||Next Generation Science Standards||Grade 3||Science and Engineering Practices|||Science and Engineering Practices: 1. Asking Questions and Defining Problems 2. Developing and Using Models 3. Planning and Carrying Out Investigations 4. Analyzing and Interpreting Data 5. Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking 6. Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions 7. Engaging in Argument from Evidence 8. Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information ||Next Generation Science Standards||Grade 4||Science and Engineering Practices|||Science and Engineering Practices: 1. Asking Questions and Defining Problems 2. Developing and Using Models 3. Planning and Carrying Out Investigations 4. Analyzing and Interpreting Data 5. Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking 6. Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions 7. Engaging in Argument from Evidence 8. Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information ||Next Generation Science Standards||Grade 5||Science and Engineering Practices|||Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object & the mass of the object.||Next Generation Science Standards||Middle School||Physical Science||Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions |||Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces. ||Next Generation Science Standards||Middle School||Physical Science||Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions |||Conduct an investigation and evaluate the experimental design to provide evidence that fields exist between objects exerting forces on each other even though the objects are not in contact. [Assessment is limited to electric and magnetic fields, and limited to qualitative evidence for the existence of fields.] ||Next Generation Science Standards||Middle School||Physical Science||Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions |||Science and Engineering Practices: 1. Asking Questions and Defining Problems 2. Developing and Using Models 3. Planning and Carrying Out Investigations 4. Analyzing and Interpreting Data 5. Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking 6. Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions 7. Engaging in Argument from Evidence 8. Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information ||Next Generation Science Standards||Middle School||Science and Engineering Practices|||Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, & its acceleration. [Objects subject to a net unbalanced force, e.g., an object falling , rolling down a ramp, or a moving- pulled by a constant force.]||Next Generation Science Standards||High School||Physical Science||Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions|||Science and Engineering Practices: 1. Asking Questions and Defining Problems 2. Developing and Using Models 3. Planning and Carrying Out Investigations 4. Analyzing and Interpreting Data 5. Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking 6. Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions 7. Engaging in Argument from Evidence 8. Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information ||Next Generation Science Standards||High School||Science and Engineering Practices

California Standards (Click to View)

1.f. Magnets have two poles, labeled north and south, and like poles repel each other while unlike poles attract each other.||CA Science||Grade 4||01. Physical Sciences||1. Electricity and magnetism are related effects that have many useful applications in everyday life.

Categories include:
  • Physical Science
  • Grades 3-5
  • Grades 6-8
  • Science
Tags: Magnetism, Forces & Motion, Patterns
Subjects covered: ["Physical Science"]